Archive for music videos

Chef Tom – It’s What’s for Lunch

Posted in Opinion with tags , , , , , , , , on February 17, 2018 by segarini

I’ve cooked a couple hundred lunches already in my just-over-a-year stint as Resident Chef at Couchsurfing. That’s a lot of recipes.  I try and switch it up, keep it fresh and interesting, and only repeat once in a while.

Before Couchsurfing, I was a personal chef for 11 years, and my specialty during that time was cooking for people with food allergies and sensitivities. I know my way around gluten, dairy, soy, shellfish and peanuts (the five most pernicious) and dozens more pesky ingredients. My current customers are millennial techies, and only a few have food concerns, so this gig has been a piece of cake.

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Frank Gutch Jr: Thompson’s and Chrystalship: The Changing of the Guard; A Video Guide to Boulder’s Zephyr; and A Short String of Notes

Posted in Opinion, Review with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 13, 2018 by segarini

The first record store I ever frequented was in Eugene, Oregon— Thompson’s.  I wanted to put “Record Mart” behind it but I am not sure how they labeled themselves.  A building on the north end of the city, not too far from Skinner’s Butte, it was small, square and as I remember it, white, with large storefront windows behind which racks of records were displayed, mostly 45s, a small wall of listening booths, and stereo equipment— lots of it.  I have no idea how I found out about it, being a small town boy who hardly ever visited the big city (and to me Eugene was big and a city), but I found myself one day, after much begging and emotional pyrotechnics, entering this Taj Mahal of vinyl.  I remember it like it was yesterday.

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Segarini – About the Grammys….

Posted in Opinion, Review with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 31, 2018 by segarini


Everybody calm down.
The Grammys aren’t about MUSIC. The Grammys are about MONEY. PEOPLE who are about MUSIC listen to far more than what is put on parade here.
The Grammy audience was down 21%, this year, their lowest ratings ever. They don’t even know why they are tanking… but I may know a big part of  the reason.

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Frank Gutch Jr: Got Them Ol’ Deadline Blues (featuring Philip B. Price, Caroline Cotter, Audrey Martells, and Jon Brion; Closing Down The Fabulous Rainbow; and Notes Not of the Underground

Posted in Opinion, Review with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 30, 2018 by segarini

Deadlines suck.  I should just end this right here (the column, not my life, though there have been times when doing that would have been better than slogging my way through what finally ended up “on paper”, the equivalence to “on tape” in the world of recording).  Nothing is ever what it seems anymore, I guess.  And the older I get, the more it seems so.  Oh, to be a Darrell Vickers who seemingly grabs mosquitoes and turns them into eagles, except when they are just mosquitoes.  Even Vickers could not have saved some of my work.  And trust me, at times like this, it is work.

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Frank Gutch Jr: The Non-Science of Record Collecting; A Tip o’ the Hat To Dave Gray (RIP); and a short look at the Notes…..

Posted in Opinion, Review with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 23, 2018 by segarini

I’m cleaning out portions of my record collection, or what is left of it.  At one time, I had over 10,000 albums (according to a friend who spent a couple of days counting them).  Over 10,000!  I woke up one day and realized that no one in their right mind would have that many, which brings me to the now-occasional columnist for DBAWIS, Darrell Vickers.  I am sure he has over 10,000 which proves that mental imbalance runs in his family.  He is the perfect dumpster for many of the albums I still have and will be a recipient of a few.  I kid, of course, because for both of us, record collecting has been and still is, in his case, an adventure.

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Frank Gutch Jr: Doug Sahm & The Search For The Perfect Taco… Plus Notes

Posted in Opinion, Review with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 16, 2018 by segarini

‘At freaking Doug Sahm.  I thought I knew him, and I do know his music, but he was a lot more complicated than I’d ever heard.  Hell of a musician.  The epitome of crazy as hell.  Hellbent on glory.  And yet shied back from it whenever it showed itself.  If his life had been all stage, I think he would have been happier, but those times in between shows and rehearsals wore him down.  There are only so many shows in any one of us and Sahm had more than most.  A lot more.

I think I learned more about him watching the documentary Sir Doug and the Genuine Texas Cosmic Groove than I could have learned outside of following him since the sixties and the explosion of Texas music (and The Sir Douglas Quintet) all over the US of A.  There is a lot to learn and watching the film a few more times will more than likely fill in some holes, but man!  What a life!

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Frank Gutch Jr: Christmas and the Doppler Effect Plus Notes and Coffee (er, Cherry Slice)

Posted in Opinion, Review with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 12, 2017 by segarini

It is almost Christmas and, as usual at this time of year, I am looking backward.  It hasn’t always been this way but the older I get the more it is,  As a child, like most children, Christmas was a fun and magical time, but to most children all of life is.  There is something about the young— they have hope and fascination for the simple things and are able to see the joy in watching ants or slugs or anything alive just live.  They wonder about the varieties of trees and why fish lay eggs and frogs too— so many eggs!  In the first grade, I used to walk way out of my way when coming home from school just to walk by the mill pond up the hill because of the clumps of frog eggs clinging to the reeds and grasses along the edge.  They were teaching us about life in school and had a fishbowl with a handful of fertilized eggs and, class by class, the teachers would have us file by once a day to see life’s progress.  To a six- or seven-year old there was pure enchantment at watching the eggs go from embryo to tadpole to frog.  No one else seemed to pay much attention, but children were enthralled.  Children, in fact, know way more than you think just because they pay attention.

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